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Tag Archives: vitamin b

What is pantothenic acid?

pantothenic-acid

Vitamin B5 supports carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism and hemoglobin synthesis. One of its roles is to help assist in the release of energy from protein, carbohydrates, and fat. A simpler way of stating this is that vitamin B5 is needed by the body for the metabolism of foods we eat. Now that we know what pantothenic acid, let's cover some of its functions.

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The ABCs of Vitamins – A Comprehensive Vitamin Guide

vitamin-abcs

Vitamins are organic compounds that are essential for normal metabolic functions. These functions include using proteins to repair injured tissue and converting fats and carbohydrates into energy. They do not supply the body with either energy or calories directly. Because vitamins (with the exception of Vitamin D) can not be synthesized by our body, they must be consumed through diet to prevent vitamin deficiency disorders.

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Water soluble vitamins

Vitamin C Vitamin C or L-ascorbic acid, or simply ascorbate (the anion of ascorbic acid), is an essential nutrient for humans and certain other animal species. Vitamin C refers to a number of vitamers that have vitamin C activity in animals, including ascorbic acid and its salts, and some oxidized forms of the molecule like dehydroascorbic acid. Ascorbate and ascorbic acid are both naturally present in the body when either of these is introduced into cells, since the forms interconvert according to pH. Vitamin C is a cofactor in at least eight enzymatic reactions, including several collagen synthesis reactions that, when dysfunctional, cause the most severe symptoms of scurvy. In animals, these reactions are especially important in wound-healing and in preventing bleeding from capillaries. Ascorbate may also act as an antioxidant against oxidative stress. However, the fact that the enantiomer D-ascorbate (not found in nature) has identical antioxidant activity to L-ascorbate, yet far less vitamin activity, underscores the fact that most of the function of L-ascorbate as a vitamin relies not on its antioxidant properties, but upon enzymic reactions that are stereospecific. “Ascorbate” without the letter for the enantiomeric form is always presumed to be the chemical L-ascorbate. In humans, ...

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